Support your website by clicking thro' this banner when you buy books, CDs, DVDs etc

Topics Topics Edit Profile Profile Help/Instructions Help    
Search Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Mid 50s, mid50s teachers

Mundella School » General Chat » Mid 50s, mid50s teachers « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Wendy Dyer nee Perkins 54-59

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Monday, April 26, 2004 - 04:52 am:   

In reply to Barrie Truman on 1st February - sorry about the delay but I only found out about the site last week - I remember the R.I. teacher you mention, wasn't her name Miss Winfield? I never used to concentrate much in her lessons which were boring because I was a regular church goer(still am!) and felt she couldn't teach me much. She got her own back though and only gave me 25% in one exam!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seymour Karz

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Monday, March 29, 2004 - 02:40 am:   

Ken Reynolds was a Flight Lt in the ATC (674) Squadron at Mundella and about 1959 he acquired a new silver Jag MkII with red interior. He certainly had this until I left in 1961. I don't recollect what he had before the Jag but it was 'sporty' and if my memory hasn't atrophied too much, he didn't keep it for too long before getting the Jag. That may well have been an A-H.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alleyn Boucher

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Friday, March 26, 2004 - 12:34 pm:   

Reynolds drove a bright red Austin Healey 3000.
In the late 50's we moved from Wollaton to Bunny from where I used to catch the bus to school. All was well until we changed headmasters and I found that our new headmaster lived at East Leake and drove past my bus stop every morning. After the embarrasment of one lift to school it was me for the bushes until he had either gone past or the bus arrived!!

Alleyn Boucher
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seymour Karz

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2004 - 04:34 am:   

Hillman Minx eh ? What about a totally purposeless, collective recollection of teacher's vehicles? To start the ball rolling:-
Barton Hart - big, old black Austin then a Triumph Renown?
Ken Reynolds - silver 2.8 MkII Jaguar
R R Stephens - Land Rover with canvas cover
Mr Barlow - BSA Bantam then Panther motorcycle combination
Van Raalte - early Reliant 3 wheeler
Miss Gibbons - Capri (?) scooter
Mr Cox - frogeye Austin Healey Sprite
Mr White - MG Magnette (after his father died!)
Mr Daykin - beige Ford Consul MkI
Seth Adams (technician) - black Austin Cambridge (with Cu exhaust fabricated in his workshop!)
Mr Hodges - was it a black Austin Somerset?

Errors and ommissions welcomed!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Monty Taylor

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Monday, March 08, 2004 - 05:35 pm:   

It was Marion Wollatt (not Wollaton) who taught Art and Doris Barlow (she lived with Dolly Onions but in the 50's we did not know about such things!) -she drove a green Hillman Minx convertible
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Moniker 47-52

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Saturday, February 14, 2004 - 06:15 pm:   

Very well done indeed,Pat, and thanks for that; when I have more time I look forward to having a good look at it again (with renewed interest).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Pat Gillette Curtis

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 04:46 am:   

Yes, Moniker, I do remember quite a lot of them -I worked in the school office for a while after leaving school and so got to know most of them as real and likeable people. Here we go, left to right: after Albert Chester, School Captain, came Messrs. Ainsworth, T.R.(?) Jones, Hart, Martin, Ordoyno, C.W. (?) Jones, Hill, Daykin, Robinson, Taylor, Birkin, Jackson, ???, Holbrook, Thorpe, Stace (Snr. Master), Calder (Head), Misses Seaton (Snr. Mistress), Plunkett, Barlow, Onions, Crossley, van Raalte, a Dom.Sci Teacher, Messrs. Reynolds, Adams, Gibbs, Baker, Misses Winfield, Schofield,Coleman, Berry, Waters, Holmes - and then School Captain, Mary Davey. Not bad after 50 years!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Moniker 47-52

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Thursday, February 12, 2004 - 05:01 am:   

Talking of remembering names …… I’ve just been looking at the panoramic photo of ’48 and I can recognise a mere handful of the staff and pupils. I wonder if there is anyone out there who is still able to put a name to all the teachers. Please ....... anyone?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Barrie Truman

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Wednesday, February 11, 2004 - 12:32 am:   

Thanks for the comments Moniker. Maybe my memory is playing tricks. It is 50 years ago and normally I can't remember what I was doing earlier in the same week. I do remember the lack of enthusiasm from some of the teachers. I was told in no uncertain terms (from Miss Barlow I think) that my drawing efforts were useless and there were similar comments from the woodwork class (can't remember the teachers name here). I certainly never went on to develop any artistic talents. Such negative remarks would probably bring about some compensation claim now.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Wilfred Bridge

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Monday, February 09, 2004 - 07:04 am:   

I suppose as the sadistic, geriatric teachers moved on in the late 50s they were thankfully replaced by a kinder and wiser breed. For example, Barton Hart by Joe Hallam or Jimmy Hill (pause to spit) by Barlow (he of the m/cycle comnbination)
No doubt other recollected replacements will be offered !

But still no girls owning up to having received the strap ?
Perhaps it just didn't happen then. . . .
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Moniker 47-52

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Sunday, February 08, 2004 - 09:21 pm:   

I’m surprised by Barrie’s reference to Miss Onions as a board-rubber thrower. In my 5 years at the school, I never knew her to do such a thing; in my experience, that was Ordoyno’s prerogative. I found her to be strict, but fair.

The teacher I most liked whilst there was Miss Van Raalte , the French teacher. I quite liked Mr Hart, Miss Barlow and Mr Ainsworth (History). I never came across Mr Reynolds (Science), but as his nickname was ‘Ratty’, I can’t say that I’m sorry!

Frankly, because I can’t remember most of my teachers at that time I assume they were, for the most part, a mediocre bunch of individuals (although as someone approaching 70, perhaps my memory isn’t quite as good as I like to think it still is!)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Barrie Truman

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Saturday, February 07, 2004 - 12:58 am:   

I was somewhat surprised to see Barton Hart on the list of goodies. I remember one occasion when a student was eating sweets during a music lesson. Both sweets and student were sent flying across the room.
I was at Mundella from 47-53 and don't remember anyone named Wollaton. This is probably my poor memory rather than anything else. I seem to remember a Barlow (Dolly I think) as the art mistress. Thinking of her reminds me of her friend, also Dolly I believe, Onions. She was a dab hand with the hard backed blackboard duster. She had a unerring aim.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

David Pygott

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Wednesday, February 04, 2004 - 09:29 pm:   

Funny things memories. Until this correspondence, I had completely forgotten about the terrorists like Hill/Ordoyno, whilst retaining clear(ish) memories of the goodies like Houseman/Plunkett/Hart/Williams and others. On the whole I was lucky and mostly escaped the attacks.

One brutal punishment I do remember was when Calder announced some misdemeanor in assembly and concluded by saying " your Father (on the PTA and hence known) would be disappointed..." I was so embarrassed by this unfair tactic that even six strokes would have been more bearable.

On another topic, which in a way is the opposite side of the coin. Does anyone remember Miss Wollaton, an art teacher in the early 50's. I still have guilty memories of our behavior in her classes. I think she ended up having a breakdown, which may or may not have been connected.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Barrie Truman

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Sunday, February 01, 2004 - 11:18 pm:   

The problem seems to be that things have now gone too far the other way. There is no control, no discipline whatsoever. A kind word and a use of common sense is fine if the recipient understands that type of approach, however, far too many take this as a sign of weakness. I remember one class, I think it was Religious Instruction, but can't remember the teacher's name, where the whole class probably enjoyed themselves but nothing was learned. The class was just full of backchat and noise, certainly no one was ever chastised. There has to be punishment when deserved, no one will learn anything from even the best teacher if the environment is wrong.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stan Hammersley

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 10:15 am:   

Dear Wilfred, Don`t knowabout the dreaded leather strap, but do remember one very famous occasion when Pop Calder caught many ten of boys AND girls sliding on the ice on the quad, lined them all up and caned them all in turn. Still cannot imagine that is worse than the mental torture of sending two young women to Coventry over the`black bra' incident!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

StanHammersley

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 06:40 am:   

Well,really set the cat among the canaries you have Mr/Ms Squeers! Please let me state here that in no way do I commend the violence and lack of teaching ability of some of the teaching staff. As you are aware the sort of tactics used by several of the staff proceed out of gross problems I would suggest in their abilities to cope with their own professional and other aspects of life. As in all fields of life ,however there were many good and worthy teachers at the school. (I have no axe to grind as the WHOLE of my education was AFTER I left Mundella) Thankyou Mr?MsSqueers for airing this subject, there will be a massive outpouring of information and comment as a result of your letter,I am sure. I have much to say myself, but as I am only able to type at one word a minute, will have to await the help of my son.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Wilfred Bridge

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 05:25 am:   

There was a story in my day that Ordoyno who used to take cricket as well as maths once hurled a cricket stump at a boy and broke his leg.
Does anyone know if it was true?
Any girls get the dreaded leather strap? If so for what?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Moniker 47-52

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 03:17 am:   

The average British grown-up has certainly come a long way in its thinking since the times you speak of.

I was so terrified of Mr. Ordoyno that I couldn’t concentrate on learning Maths at all, and he is one of those teachers I remember, not with pleasure, but with utter contempt. It was only long after my schooldays that I took an interest in the subject and quite enjoyed it.

I have, to this day, a damaged little finger on my left hand which I acquired at junior school at the tender age of 8 or 9. The teacher who assaulted me (fully-grown male) chose to hit me (four foot nothing little girl) for talking in class (I actually spoke one word, “Yes” to a question from the girl sitting on my right.) The ‘weapon’ he chose was a three foot rule which caused severe swelling to my whole hand, making it impossible for me to fasten my coat at hometime. Nothing was done; the unacceptable was quite acceptable in those days – but – they were very careful to enquire which hand you used for writing before committing their assaults.

I do believe that parents should smack their children, and I mean ‘smack’ when that is the only option, but I don’t think that anyone has any right whatsoever to smack someone else’s child, particularly sado-masochistic teachers who displayed such abnormal behaviour.

Going back to Mr. Ordoyno, I remember one lesson in which he wrote on the blackboard a problem which involved £.s.d. He half wrote the word ‘farthing’ and turned round to face the class, whereupon there was considerable mirth. I can remember feeling acutely embarrassed at the time, but later when I recalled the incident, I have a very strong suspicion that he probably played out that scenario to every unfortunate class he took.

Teachers hitting children, as happened in our days, didn’t work, did it? The proof being that the same people were ‘punished’ time and time again.

And let no one tell me that ‘it never did anyone any harm’ – I have had a deformed little finger for the past 60 years to disprove that !
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Wackford Squeers

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 06:01 am:   

On January 18th, Mr Hammersley asks “Where is everyone?”
So there’s a dearth of new postings on the site.
Perhaps then, a new thread on the subject of sadistic teachers?
I was an attendee from the mid 50s, in an era now fondly remembered by several posters as “happy days” characterised by disciplinarian teachers.
Such teachers do not represent happy memories for me. In those days I bore them malice, now with most of them dead, I just recollect them with sadness.
Are we to believe that at that time, such sadism was the norm and was therefore somehow good for us? Did we learn more from those who bullied and intimidated or from those who taught with knowledge and sensitivity? In my case it was certainly the latter. The girls, the meek and the academic (clever?) were never subject to the physical violence of the odious Jimmy Hill or Ordoyno. Instead, it was us, the scholastic non-entities, who were the frequent victims of their sadistic behaviour.
One problem was always that their displays of physical violence were so unpredictable. In the 5th form ca. 1960, the otherwise benign and friendly Dakin (English) reacted to my informing others soto voce that “Dakin’s coming!” with an almighty slap across my head. It was no playful, reproachful tap but a premeditated swipe of some strength.
Others, I remember with particular rancour, when writing on the blackboard and upon hearing voices behind, would hurl with great force the felt-faced wooden board wiper in the general direction of wherever they thought the noise emanated. Frequently it would hit some pupil on the head who, oblivious to what was going on, had their head down writing. I have never viewed such antics with anything approaching humour.
When in the 3rd form we were subject to the bullying of Jimmy Hill and his own brand of mathematics. He once instructed the class to get their pens and write. I discovered my fountain pen top had separated within my inside jacket pocket and was fumbling to extricate the nib from my pocket lining. The next thing I knew I was hit across the face with such force that all went black for several seconds. The marks on my face were still present many hours later when I got home. The last thing I’d do would be to tell my father how they were acquired. Yet one boy did tell his father and Hill was to find himself on the receiving end of substantial and unambiguous threats from a Mr Webb.
It is not that I object to the use of reasonable physical punishment when merited. Rather, it was the gratuitous violence of several teachers who felt that their authority could only be enforced by such means.
I acknowledge it was no different at most Nottingham secondary schools at that time. We had moved on from Dickensian days and we’ve moved on again, thankfully. But not everyone has fond memories of life at Mundella GS.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Action:

Administration Administration Log Out Log Out   Previous Page Previous Page Next Page Next Page